Pixsell 27/03/2014
Davor Javorovic/PIXSELL/Pixsell

It's not just dogs that resemble their owners; a new study by the University of Vienna has discovered a strong resemblance between drivers and their cars.

In research that has possibly done the least to further advancement of humankind, psychologists Stefan Stiegar and Martin Voracek also deduced that as a result of this correlation, our pets also resemble the front ends of our vehicles.

"The initial idea was born as I was reading the article about 'dogs do resemble their owners,"' Stiegar told the Daily Mail.

"I thought, this could also replicate when using cars instead of dogs. This was some sort of everyday hypothesis because I frequently found that cars, to some extent, resemble their owners."

The study involved taking pictures of 30 drivers and their vehicles (with the stipulation that they had chosen the car for themselves), before mixing the images with those of non-owners and asking 160 participants to rank who was most likely to own the vehicle on scale of one six.

The results showed that the participants would assign different design traits on the front of the cars to that of the potential owner's face, and more often than not, would guess correctly.

The study also showed that the driver's gender or age were not considered important factors, with their face being the main indicator of which car they were likely to own.

The front-end styling of the car was revealed as the most important aspect of determining the correct owner, as when the experiment was repeated with images of the sides and rears of vehicles, participants were much less likely to identify the correct owner.

Commenting on his study, Stiegar said: "I was surprised, indeed.

"This was the reason why we replicated it a further two times. But what surprised me most was that the effect basically remained after controlling for possible stereotypes."