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Drivers in the Chinese city of Shenzhen who are caught dazzling other motorists through "inappropriate" use of their high-beam headlamps are to be subjected to on-the-spot training over the dangers they pose.

However, unlike the classic British speed awareness course, those unfortunate enough to be caught out won't receive much in the way of an education, as the training itself consists of being sat in front of the police car's high-beams and being forced to stare into them for several minutes.

Those who refuse face being fined, having their cars confiscated and losing their licences.

A spokesman for the local traffic police department said: "We have had a few critics but overall the vast majority of people have approved the initiative," reports the Daily Star.

"Anybody caught with full beam is asked to pay a small fine (around £30) and has to stare at the headlights themselves to see what it is like."

Unsurprisingly, this new tactic has come in for heavy criticism, with people taking to Weibo (China's version of Twitter) to vent their ire.

"It will do harm to the driver's health and may cause more danger on the road as the driver will get tired after the punishment. We'd better think twice before judging this kind of punishment," wrote one user.

Many, however, appeared to support the new initiative, claiming that this form of retributive justice was just the thing that was needed to tackle the problem of inconsiderate driving in the city.

How would you react to being subjected to such "on the spot training"? Have your say in the comments section below.