Ferrari GTB/C Speciale

An ultra-rare 1960s Ferrari is expected to become the most expensive car ever to wear the famous prancing horse badge, when it goes under the hammer next month.

This Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale by Scaglietti – to give it its full name – is just one of three ever to emerge from the Italian marque's factory gates in Maranello. It was built to comply with homologation rules, allowing Ferrari to compete in its then brand-new 275 GTB racing car. This particular example never saw battle, but its sister car took an overall third place at the iconic 24hr race that year.

Built to take the fight to the Americans – namely the Ford GT40 and Shelby Daytona – at Le Mans in 1965, the GTB was highly advanced for its time and was the first Ferrari to feature independent rear suspension.

It also boasted an extra 70bhp over the standard 275 GTB, thanks to fettling to its glorious V12 engine. The Speciale also features aluminium bodywork and a dry-sumped engine, which gives a lower centre of gravity.

Set to be sold at RM Auctions' Monterey sale on August 15, the Speciale has an estimated value of around £20million, which would make it the most expensive Ferrari ever to be sold at auction – comfortably outdoing the current record holder, a Ferrari 275 GTB/4 NART Spider that sold for £16million in 2013.

Aside from its sheer rarity, this particular model's value is boosted by the fact that it is a 'matching numbers' car, with the serial codes on the chassis, gearbox and engine all matching, proving their originality.