The only estate version ever built of the classic early 1970s Aston Martin DBS is going to be auctioned on May 19 by Bonhams.

With an expected price of £50,000 - £70,000, the DBS estate is relatively affordable by the standards of classic Aston Martins, as most 1960s Astons are now over £100,000.
The car was built specially for an unnamed Scottish Laird who wanted it for salmon fishing trips – hence the roof rack for his fishing gear. Perhaps surprisingly the Laird got bored with it and sold it in 1975 to its present owner, who repainted it from red to the classic dark blue metallic that was so popular in the early 1970s.

The conversion was done by a company called FLM in Battersea, South London, who also made a Rover 2000 estate at the time. FLM created bespoke rear side windows for the DBS estate, but the problem with a conversion is always the tailgate, which would be incredibly expensive to design and build as a one-off. FLM solved the problem by using an adapted tailgate from a Hillman Hunter estate, and we have to say, it looks extremely well integrated.

The car appears to have been very well maintained, including a conversion to run on unleaded petrol, and has been featured in a number of magazines over the years. The only negative factor is that it uses the 4.0 litre 6-cylinder engine from the DB6, not the 5.3 litre V8 that became standard in 1972. When the DBS was first introduced the new V8 engine was not yet ready, so early ones had to make to with the smaller engine.

The DBS is part of a long British tradition of fast estates, from the Aston Martin DB5 to the 1980s Jaguar XJS-based Lynx Eventer. Indeed with the Reliant Scimitar GTE of 1970, Britain can claim to have made the first production high performance estate car.