A lovely red classic Jaguar E-Type once owned by the inimitably flamboyant Elton John is up for auction. The car, once named as the best ever made by a little know car journalist called Jeremy something-or-other, is expected to fetch up to £70,000 when Bonhams put it under the hammer in March.

However, its pop star provenance hasn't really helped with the price, because its current owner may have to swallow a £30,000 loss - he paid £81,000 for it at a Christie's auction arranged by the Candle In The Wind singer in 2001. The car's official reserve price is £50-70,000.

Nonetheless, it's a beautiful thing, in immaculate condition throughout, and it comes with Elton's original 'OKE 1' number plate.


Because of the plate, the car came to be nicknamed 'OK Elton' by the man himself and his staff; it's a phrase the old diva has no doubt heard many, many more times throughout his career than 'No, Elton'.

The car is a 1965 Series 1 E-Type Roadster, powered by a 4.2-litre engine capable of pushing it to 62mph in under seven seconds and on to 150mph. That's hot hatch performance these days, but back then the E-Type was outrageously fast - and stunning, with Enzo Ferrari himself famously calling it the "most beautiful car in the world." High praise indeed.


According to the Daily Mail, the current owner has only done 1,000 miles in the car in the 11 years he's owned it.

Jaguar E-Type prices vary significantly depending on provenance and condition - as with most classic cars - and Elton's ex-runabout is roughly in line with current prices.

Other cars for sale at the March auction, being held at Bonham's Oxford, include a 1961 Morgan Plus 4 Supersports High Line, which has "undergone a £100,000 restoration," according to Bonhams, but is expected to fetch, oddly, around £60,000.

A 1961 Ferrari 250 GTE is on the cards too, expected to go for £50,000, as well as our particular highlight, a 1966 Citroën DS21 Décapotable. The French car, below, is one of only 50 ever sent to the UK and is famous in Citroen circles for being perhaps the best example left. It should change hands for about £40,000.